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the results are hard to measure and our cultural diplomacy can't make up for use of things like drones. we're joined by our panel. and for all of us who it is your first time watching tonight, we're all about access. we use a variety of technologies. including skype, which allows us to reach all sorts of people. cynthia, we want to start with you. in many ways this sounds like a fancy name for goodwill gestures. how do you really define cultural diplomacy? >> that's hard to do. let me start with sample definition and then tell you what i think it isn't anymore. cultural diplomacy is people to people diplomacy for the 21st centry. diplomacy is no longer government to government or men sitting around trees signing treaties. so what is it then? i think it should be as much about intake as about output. you know, we think of the traditional model of sending american jazz musicians around the world which worked very effectively in the cold war period, when we clearly were about winning hearts and minds. and what we understood then was it wasn't just about packaging a positive message. it was ab
. >> hi, i'm lisa flesher and you're in the stream. pakistan and the u.s., friends, enemies orr friend mys. we take an independent look at this complicated relationship. our digital producer bringing in all your live feedback of which we have tons today. >> all angles. international tweets. and pakistanis can agree they agree on knock. then we have brandon. pakistan wants what the u.s. has but hates what they stand for. and here is my favorite comment on facebook. united states has had an arranged marriage, they are always in court filing before divorce, by the end of staying married, but living separated but america still has to pay child support, after all there was love at some point. >> and the kids being the people of both countries totally confused. >> . >> drones, nukes, the talibans and anti-sentiments. these are just some of the issues that are complicated the fractures u.s. pakistan alliance since 9/11. pakistan is a recipient of a huge chunk of military aid. but mutual mistrust and the arms of groups brought into questions whether both countries stage share a strategi
. and pakistanis can agree they agree on knock. then we have brandon. pakistan wants what the u.s. has but hates what they stand for. and here is my favorite comment on facebook. united states has had an arranged marriage, they are always in court filing before divorce, by the end of staying married, but living separated but america still has to pay child support, after all there was love at some point. >> and the kids being the people of both countries totally confused. >> . >> drones, nukes, the talibans and anti-sentiments. these are just some of the issues that are complicated the fractures u.s. pakistan alliance since 9/11. pakistan is a recipient of a huge chunk of military aid. but mutual mistrust and the arms of groups brought into questions whether both countries stage share a strategic effort. many americans view pack scan a country of 200 million people exclusively through the helps of violence. while many harbor conspiracy theories about america's role in the world. so how fragile is the alliance and what is it's future? to discuss this, we are joined by daniel marquise. at the counc
houses is a growing movement here in the u.s. where people are trading in big to live small. one, the tiny house movement has hundreds of members, and one community said it's a very charmer concept and they learn more about it, and the reality starts to sink in. >> this is not a new phenomenon. this is a 1920s house on wheels. and check this out, this is a washington d.c. 140-foot square-foot house. and looking cheesy there, but our community says: >> >> well, you have a lot of truck? >> but where's the bathroom? >> we're going to find out. since 1970, the average house size has doubled remains but for some, bigger is not better. >> i guess that the aspect of a small house is freedom. the world gets a lot bigger when you're living small because i can afford to do a lot more things in terms of cash and time. the whole world is now my living room. >> the living small movement doesn't stop at tiny houses. microapartments are popping up in many areas from seattle to new york city. but concerns over zoning. downsizing, is the american dream changing with the idea that less is more?
. and the technologies like skype and google, it's not always perfect, but it allows us to expand our reach and bring voices into it. explain the cartel's link into the avocado tree. industry? >> they first started going into the state institution that regulates the avocados, and every farmer needs to register with them. and register how much land they own and how much they're trying to export, et cetera. so the cartel moved into setting up the institution, and they started bribing and threatening people within the institution to hand over the lists of information. they got ahold of extremely detailed information on what everybody had and tried to export and they knew exactly how much to extort from everyone, and that's how it started. >> you said that farmers have been victimized by the cartel. and talk about the tactics they're using and the degree of violence down there. >> thank you so much for letting me come on the show, i really appreciate it. the knights templar are an organization that have been careful to brand themselves as part of the community. and they frame themselves to be a social e
is a force in hiphop. and 30 years later, mcdaniels is still using his music as an advocacy tool. however, many criticize it for lacking substance and negative narrative. to break down hiphop's growing pains, we're so excited to have you here. and we have been talking about this for weeks. i used to torture my grandparents, i would stay with them in the summer, and it would make them crazy, but i love you, i grew up with you. >> it was a good time. and somebody told me today, i was three years old sitting there listening it my father's cassettes and i know all of your moves. >> this guy is too young. >> i was rocking oshkosh b'gosh, and so did the online community. as i was telling you, you say hiphop and politics, and it opens up a pandora's box. and you say run dmc is here. he says: we're joined today with four hiphop enthusiasts, and we're going to get to them in the show. but loyal stream team, you're in the show, and throughout today's discussion, engage us using the twitter hashtag. >> there seems to be a lot of nostalgia for old school hiphop. and you were part of that. and you cre
shows at show us how we as humans treat each other. >>> i want to ask max brooks why did you return from making a zombie guide. did he do it to appeal to a wider audience? >> we'll be barraging that. >>> beyond the zombie buzz could the disasse disaster fiction prs for the real thing. and it's resonating with a lot of people. the cdc has applied the zombie narrative for it's own comic book for emergency preparedness. max brooks joins us on the set to look at the bigger picture. thanks for being o on "the stream". thanks for being here. >>> we have questions for max on google a little later in the show. >> max who is your audience. >> >> think i think it's a broad spectrum. you have people into zombies and survivalist culture and people that are into big picture disaster preparedness. i have spoken at the naval war college and i have worked with the cdc. and that is like cutting strategic air command o often oe of the commissionaire crisis. >>> we have to have stories. what do people say to you when they approach you on the street and realize who you are. >> when they approach me on the s
>> hey, i'm wajahat ali and you're in the stream. obesity, so many of us can relate. lisa fletcher is away but my man omar is here. you and i can empathize for today's show, i wore husky pants growing up i was a quote unquote husky kid. that was me at 11. and tit for tat, you have a gut hanging out. 66% of americans are overweight, and there's been a two irdz thdz increase -- two-thirds are increase in,. >> who says in my experience i've noticed a difference in how i'm treated pre, and post-losing 60 pounds. much more post. of course those of you at home we want you to be a partly of the are conversation. use the hash hashtag that you sn the screen, #ajam stream. >> studies of parents of overweight kids are less likely to help them pay for things like a car or you know, college which is important. discrimination is also documented in children as young as the age of 3. the biggest problem isn't about keeping an eye on the scale. rather it's the way other americans rue, treat and shame them -- view, treat and shame them. >> i'm overweight and it's obviously a hard thing to deal with
integrate in the league. there is study after academic study that shows that the use of native american mass cots actually allows the dominant culture to turn a blind eye to the very problems on the res that regina describes. the taking on the poverty that she is describing and then the last point if i could the last thing i should say is regina said something profoundly offensive. there are tribal council to tribal council from the choctaw to the american indian movement, who oppose the name, is profoundingly misleading for your audience. >> but suzanne is saying the same thing. regina go ahead and speak and then mike we'll get to you. assembly appreciate that. the crux of the matter, let's go to the declaration of independence, uses the phrase, merciless native american indian. you should be leading the fight with the federal government. i think some of your action he are suspect. i respect some of your work, you have done good work in the past but forfeiting the spotlight on this issue is a disservice for those who live on the res. getting back to the founder of the redskins, any founderr
have weafted ou wasted our live. you were once a geek and husky and healthy like me. talk to us how your geeky childhood in234r50u7bsz influenced your path to success. >> i was lucky that neither of my parents had nick i anything e way of a tech background. they had resources to buy a powerful computer a pc that they gave me total freedom with. as long as you can put it back together and take it apart and do what you want with it. they didn't fully understand what it would do but they had an e amuncahunch it would be importa. >> i played way too much video games and soon i wanted to build my observe. my -- own. learning how to build became a hobby. my friends and i spent too much time messing around with nothing. it gave us an outlet and we could build web sites and have people all over the word like 50 people looking at the thing we had made. and it made what filete what fee insignificant living significant. we were dorky high school kids but on the internet w we were people with ideas and we could be resuspecte respected as such. >> now everyone is talking about new media. mill le
... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >>> welcome back. we're talking about college athletes and whether they should get paid. before the break we asked about athletes. tim these student athletes receive scholarships to attend school and play their sport. studies show between their scholarships, room, boar
and you're in the you're in the stream. stream. obesity, so many of us can obesity, so many of us can relate. relate. lisa fletcher is away but lisa fletcher is away but my man my man omar is here. omar is here. you and i can empathize for you and i can empathize for today's show, i wore husky pants today's show, i wore husky pants growing up i was a growing up i was a quote unquote quote unquote husky kid. husky kid. that was me at 11. that was me at 11. and and tit for tat, you have a gut tit for tat, you have a gut hanging out. hanging out. 66% of americans are overweight, 66% of americans are overweight, and there's been a two irdz thdz and there's been a two irdz thdz increase -- increase -- two-thirds two-thirds are are increase in,. increase in,. >> who says in my experience >> who says in my experience i've noticed a difference in how i've noticed a difference in how i'm treated i'm treated pre, and post-losing pre, and post-losing 60 pounds. 60 pounds. much more post. much more post. of course those of you at home of course those of you at home we want you to be a we want you
walters. "the stream" is next. check you want u.s. out 24 hours a day on aljazerra.com. what it means for civil society. >> our digital producer is here, bringing all of your live field back in the program. freedom of speech, national security. whistle blowers and criminals and you name it. >> we'll have comments on all of it. but you mentioned hackers, criminals whistle blowers. on twitter. all exploits to security loopholes. and regardless of intention, stealing is stealing. check this out: >> glad to see everybody in our opinion agrees. >> always. >> claims to fight social injustice, but instead of the town square, they're using the digital face. they explain, groups like anonymous are looking to fight civil disobedience for the digital age, but some disagree with the way they go about it. with the whistle blowers, the government sees prosecution. jeremy hanson pled guilty, an admission that carries up to 10 years behind bars. and in the 2011 hack of stratfer, emmails, the crimes for these companies and government agencies and how they gain information about activists. h
's to do with a drone strike. they are accusing the u.s. of involving themselves in the peace talks. it was a ambush. it was not a fire from the front it was an ambush. and we see it as an ambush. >> the assembly is going to pass a unanimous declaration not to allow any nato sp supply to entr the province until though tell us the drone attacks have stopped. roslin joins us with more on. this what are the pakistani leaders accusing the us u.s. government of. >> there are two things they are accusing the obama administration of doing. one of violating pac pakistani sovereignty by launching a military attack on pakistani soil without islamabad's permission. and the other thing islamabad is accusing them of doing is skuttling an effort to broker peace talks about the pakistani taliban. therthey are arguing that with e death that basically that everything is lameverything islg to achieve is back at square one. the pack ta pakistani citizens g to be suffering from the attacks within their borders. >>> vandait's widely assumed the pakistani government has been cooperating first with the bu
and in this situation are never complete in terms of making us certain that the they don't theo out and pursuing vigorously nuclear weapons in the future. if we are serious about diplomacy there is no need for new sanctions on top of the sanction that's are already very effective and brought them to the table in the first place. now if it turns out they can't deliver and they can't come to the table in this way and get this resolve and the sanctions can be ramped back up and we have that option. roger it's his birthday. happy birthday. >> back to healthcare. can you guarantee to the americanamerican people that the is going to be operational by november 30th. and secondly more broadly this is your signature on domestic legs. legislation. you hear on the hill that--is that how this mess came to be? >> i think thi there is going te a lot of there is going to be a lot of evaluation of how we got to this point. and i'm assuring you i have been asking a lot of questions about that. the truth is that this is number one, very complicated. and the website itself is doing a lot of stuff. there are not a
lawsuit, players are seeking compensation for use of their likeness. that means they want to be paid when their images appear in rebroadcasts of games, dvds, photos, video games and other places, once that stopped playing college sports. that lawsuit has opened a much broader discussion about whether student athletes should be paid. the ncaa say the education is the payment. omar is here filling in for wajahat ali. we asked our community is enough compensation. >> we have been getting a lot of interesting responses. ricky say there is no reason why student athletes shouldn't be paid at this point. of course for those of you at home, we want you to join the conversation, so please join us on twitter. >> joining us is a college baseball player who played at ucla and went on to the nba. and the co-chair of the college sports law practice, a former associate director of enforcement with the ncaa. a former football player at usc, and sports commentator with espn. if this is your first time watching us, we're all about access. we use a variety of technologies including google hangout. bob i wan
, if this is your first time watching u. we do things differently here to get diverse on the program. we use a variety of technologies, including skype, and it's not always technologically perfect, but it allows us to reach a lot of people. so elise, what made your decision to go small? >> it wasn't going small, but i didn't want to go broke. i have lived in new york for ten years, and i came to new york to be a writer and i wanted to frida trymanhattan. when i walked in, i was shocked. but it was 90 square feet. and the woman who lived there had stuff everywhere, but i signed up for one year, and something happened in that one year. i got rid of a lot of my belongings because i had to fit in that apartment. a lot had to go into storage, and by the end of the year, i got rid of a lot of it. and i realized by living in that small space, you need less to be happy. i lived there, and finished writing the book and i realized that living with less, you get more out of life. i could equipped my job and -- quit my job, and edged write at my own leisure. i had less overhead literally. wanted to do.
that are affecting us then we are able to move through action through dialogue and understanding we are raibl to reflect and understand the issues that are affecting one community affect all communities. >> yail you are a jewish american film miker trying do a art. when you are trying to do this talk to me about the feedback you get from your own community. some people say you are traitor. what is the feedback? >> no one's called me a traitor yet. >> okay, good. >> no one's called me a traitor. i believe what we're doing at slim peace which is a nonprofit organization which brings together jewish and muslim women and is open of woms of all faith but is run by a jewish woman and omuslim woman, a universal topic which goes very deep, very intimate and the results have been extraordinary. we have seen in 23 groups, 20 in the middle east, two piloted in boston, one that's happening now in d.c., and 16 cities across the u.s., that want to start groups of bringing together women of different faiths, through a health program. and overall, they've said to us two huge things: one is, 90% of what they
social injustice, but instead of the town square, they're using the digital face. they explain, groups like anonymous are looking to fight civil disobedience for the digital age, but some disagree with the way they go about it. with the whistle blowers, the government sees prosecution. jeremy hanson pled guilty, an admission that carries up to 10 years behind bars. and in the 2011 hack of stratfer, emmails, the crimes for these companies and government agencies and how they gain information about activists. hamem says that the supporters say that it's justified because it shoals how government can spy on citizens. so are hackers as whistle blowers acting in the public interest or as criminals? joining me is natasha, she focuses on civil liberties, and she's been following the hammond case closely. one of the attorneys for jeremy hammond, and foust, and andy norton. welcome to stream. and jeremy's sentencing is friday, and he faces ten years in prison. and you're advocating for him to get finally served. he committed the crime. and why should he get off? >> well, he made a huge contribu
'll ever love. and across the u.s., 26 million couples are parenting kids, and while the majority of these households are made up of a mother and a father, some are two moms and some are two dads. >> he came to us as a four-month-old. a baby. >> in the u.s., roughly 95,000 same-sex couples are raising children. most are raising one parent's biological child, but some are choosing to adopt. 19 states and the district of columbia are allowing sim sex couples to adopt. and in many of those states, same-sex can adopt the biological children of their partners. mississippi and utah have banned gay adoption. >> when people and me what it was like growing up with two mops, i usually ask them, what was it like growing up with a mom and dad? they usually reply, normal. and i say, me too. >> recent studies have offered conflicting impact on the impact, and while the majority of those as well as being raised by a mom and a dad, studies show that not having a parent is harder than having gender roles in the home. but is it the parents or the quality of the parenting that has a bigger impact?
there is study after academic study that shows that the use of study that shows that the use of native american mass cots native american mass cots actually allows the dominant actually allows the dominant culture to turn a blind eye to culture to turn a blind eye to the very problems on the res the very problems on the res that regina that regina describes. describes. the taking on the taking on the poverty that the poverty that she is describing and then the she is describing and then the last point if i could the last last point if i could the last thing i should say is regina thing i should say is regina said something profoundly said something profoundly offensive. offensive. there are tribal council to there are tribal council to tribal council from the choctaw tribal council from the choctaw to the american indian to the american indian movement, movement, who oppose the name, is who oppose the name, is profoundingly misleading for profoundingly misleading for your audience. your audience. >> but suzanne is saying the >> but suzanne is saying the same thing. same thing. regina go ahead a
led the soviet assistance, and welcome to all of you. >> thank you for having us. >> so marco, when we hear about fukushima these days, we hear about the plant or the workers, but we don't really hear about what's going on on the ground. what's the daily life like for people there? and as we mentioned, your family and friends are there, and what are they dealing with every day? >> well, it has been very, very difficult, because initially, they wanted to get out of the place, because many people are not aware of the dangers of radiation. but gradually, because of the media, because of the government, everybody is telling fukushima that fukushima is fine, and you can eat fukushima foods. you don't have to go. if you go, you can't get medical expense, or you can't join the medical tests. they have been doing. so most of them kind of like -- there are three different -- >> so if you leave the area, you don't get medical care provided by the government? >> that's right. so they have to be there. and there are basically three different kinds of groups. one group, they're very aware of all
make a world of difference. joining us tonight from new york is rabbi mark schneier, are co-author of sons of abraham. in d.c., im are yel elacmmach. and on skype, sheik yassir ladi. you and why rabbi shansa, why are these two groups particularly acute? >> we wrote about issues that divide and we also wrote about issues that unite. as the children of abraham. muslims and jews we recognize that we share both a common faith, and we share a common fate. and how our single destiny must strengthen our bonds of concern and compassion and caring for each other. but the work that the imam and i do is about dialogue, about fighting, about use speaking out about islam phobia, about muslims speaking out about antisemitism and antiholocaust denial within the muslim community. i say that the muslims who fight for their own rights are not pass honorable as when they fight for the rights of all people. that is journey that the imam and i are now on, 35 countries six continents and we are leading the effort bringing a reconciliation between muslims and jews worldwide. >> and we're going to
us from dealey plaza to tell us about the events scheduled there, and it is a huge event there as thousands are expected to attend. >> that's right. dell. as the ceremony is about to start, so is the sleet. a very cold and windy day for dallas. nothing like the bright sun shown over dallas in 1963, but as you can see this is not keeping the crowd at home. 14,000 wanted to be here today, they applied to be here, and only 5,000 were picked in a lottery, randomly to be here, and they are not letting this chance escape them to be here. no umbrellas are allowed for security reasons. the city of dallas is putting a lot of emphasis on making this event flawless after having gained the reputation of being, quote, the city of hate, following the assassination 50 years ago. this is a chance for the city to come full circle and show the world how far it has come. >> and heidi you did something fascinating earlier today. you showed us your perspective and where -- the book depository is. could you have your cameraman show us exactly how close that room is to where president kennedy w
america. i'm del walters in new york. "the stream" is next. and always check us out 24 hours a day at aljazeera.com. precipitation overdoses are alarmingly high in the u.s. military. is indies cell natural dispensing of painkillers and psychiatric drugs to blame? ♪ ♪ >>> could the military have a drug problem? the he is department of defense spends billions of drugs to treat mental illness and reduce pain, in fact a recent report by the department of veterans affairs found that v.a. doctors prescribe specifically more opiates to stress patients than other veterans. congress held a hearing. family members, veterans and doctors testified about the culture of prescribing drugs at the v.a. >> unfortunately, we have given the veterans the impression that for whatever problem they have, we have a pill to help it. one or two bills to depression, one for anxiety. one or two for sleep, one for ptsd. add a few more pills for hypertension, diabetes, asthma, then add one or two or three precipitations for narcotics, what happens if a vet adds some over the counter medications or if he drin
home parks in palo alto because the school district is amazing joining us on science is gabriel metcalf. he is the director of spur. in our google hang out is jennifer frieden bacch. andnd iin the hang out maria isa housing rights organizer for just cause. gabriel it's all about supply and demand. as is the case when this happens in most steve. do you think there is something that is going on that is thank that is unique to san francisco that makes it difficult to find affordable housing? >> i think we came by this problem honestly, the we are telling with it are first it's a great city. and second our regional economy is generating a ton of jocks. jocks -- jobs so it's a nice problem to have. the third reason it's our own fault. we have not allowed s so very mh housing t to be built in decade. a lot of demand to live here and a constrained supply because of our own choices. the inevitable results is sky rocketing prices it's a really bad situation. the down sides of this far out weigh the up sides, although there are both. there will not be an easy solution. but there are things we can
't happen overnight, and they're not the result of one person. so walk us down the road that you think got the philly school district into this current mess. >> well, it's really a long-running crisis in the fact that large school systems like philadelphia, have a large fon-white student body have have been underfunded for years, and enormous cuts, and we have seen in the last ten years, the state control of the philly schools, the state took over a decade ago, and the rapid expansion of charter schools, and for each student that enrolls in charter schools, that costs the district an estimated $7,000. so the rapid unchecked growth of charter schools, combined with the enormous cuts to public education, under republican governor, tom corbett, has made an unfair situation catastrophic. >> you work in three schools in the city, and give us your perspective. how is it affecting the parents, the kids, your colleagues. >> well, i've been lucky enough to be in three different situations. one of the situations was in a community where parents didn't really have finances and weren't able to support
an impact today? surely arguebly black nationalism boys race, politics and the u.s. if not globally we have today. steve thomas, however, black nationalism today is a lot of rhetoric and academia types with salary and a little bit of shot light than a complete overhall of the structure. >> well, joining us to discuss malcolm x's legacy dr. cornell west, renown academic, and is malcolm x real or not reinvented. you know , black nationalism tanks on different meanings, depending on who you ask. >> i think black nationalism is always relevant because it's founded on three pillars, self-respect, self defense, self determination. malcolm x one of the great freedom fighters was about what? impeccable integrity. he would never sell out. tell the truth, be willing to pay the price. he was always willing to express righteous indignation because he had a deep abiding love of black people. he had a deep abuing love for white, yellow, red, brown. >> has it changed depending on the era? >> first of all, let me second that emotion from my brother west. >> i feel music hyped that. >> brother herb got smok
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 74 (some duplicates have been removed)